News

Fri, 06/09/2017

CAMBRIDGE, MA | Essigmann Lab News
June 9, 2017

On Friday, June 9, a longtime member of the Essigmann Group received his PhD from MIT. Congratulations to Dr. Shiou-chi Steven Chang on his graduation! As Professor John Essigmann's last graduate student, Chang will continue his career...

Tue, 05/02/2017

Decades can pass before signs of developing liver cancer appear to a patient or doctor, so early detection is critical. Pairing a unique understanding of cancerous genetic mutation patterns with cutting-edge lab technology, NIEHS-supported researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology...

Tue, 03/28/2017

Several decades elapse between liver cancer initiation and the appearance of tumors, and there are rarely overt clues that presage the appearance of disease. There is an acute need for biomarkers of incipient carcinogenesis when the disease is clinically addressable. This work used high-fidelity...

Mon, 03/27/2017

MIT researchers have now developed a way to determine, by sequencing DNA of liver cells, whether those cells have been exposed to aflatoxin. This profile of mutations could be used to predict whether someone has a high risk of developing liver cancer, potentially many years before tumors...

Fri, 08/07/2015

Chronic inflammation caused by disease or exposure to dangerous chemicals has long been linked to cancer, but exactly how this process takes place has remained unclear.

Now, a precise mechanism by which chronic inflammation can lead to cancer has been uncovered by researchers at MIT — a...

Wed, 04/01/2015

In the 1970s, epidemiologists found that workers in factories using vinyl chloride, the key ingredient for PVC plastics, had unusually high rates of a rare form of liver cancer called angiosarcoma.

Biologists later identified a mutation that appears to be associated with this cancer,...

Tue, 07/29/2014

Fifteen years ago, MIT professor John Essigmann and colleagues from the University of Washington had a novel idea for an HIV drug. They thought if they could induce the virus to mutate uncontrollably, they could force it to weaken and eventually die out — a strategy that our immune system uses...

Fri, 07/25/2014

The new manuscript, titled "Tautomerism provides a molecular explanation for the mutagenic properties of the anti-HIV nucleoside 5-aza-5,6-dihydro-2′-deoxycytidine" has been published this week in the early edition of PNAS. The paper studies the mechanism of mutagenesis of the anti-HIV compound...